China to gain most from GMR’s Male woes

Dec 08 2012, 11:38 IST
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An aerial picture of the airport in Maldives January 10, 2005. (Reuters) An aerial picture of the airport in Maldives January 10, 2005. (Reuters)
SummaryChina could well turn out to be the biggest beneficiary of GMR’s forced exit from Male airport.

zone and an economic support package worth a further $500 million.

China has been consistently expanding its own interests in island nations on India’s periphery – the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Seychelles and Mauritius – all countries in where India has traditionally been the main strategic provider. Beijing has provided those countries with several millions of dollars in aid and infrastructure projects. The perceived threat to India’s influence in the region and, potentially, its security, has led to increased aid to these countries from New Delhi. That is especially so in the Maldives, which sits on an important sea line of communication between the West and East Asia.

However, experts now opine that this military relationship could be put on hold. With elections a little more than a year away, the future of the Maldives and the region is still uncertain. Given the confused nature in which the Maldivian transfer of power took place, India would benefit from an election held as soon as possible, say experts.

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