NASA's Mars rover arrives at next science destination

Apr 07 2014, 16:58 IST
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With arrival at this location, Curiosity has driven at total of 6.1 kilometres since landing inside Gale Crater on Mars in August 2012. (Reuters) With arrival at this location, Curiosity has driven at total of 6.1 kilometres since landing inside Gale Crater on Mars in August 2012. (Reuters)
SummaryNASA's Mars Curiosity rover has arrived at a scientifically enticing destination to carry out the next drilling operation in...

NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has arrived at a scientifically enticing destination to carry out the next drilling operation in search of clues about ancient Red planet environment that may have been favourable for life.

Last week, Curiosity drove the last 98 feet needed to arrive at a site planned since early 2013 as a destination for studying rock clues about ancient environments, NASA said.

The rover reached a vantage point for its cameras to survey four different types of rock intersecting in an area called "the Kimberley," after a region of western Australia.

"This is the spot on the map we've been headed for, on a little rise that gives us a great view for context imaging of the outcrops at the Kimberley," said Melissa Rice of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

Rice is the science planning lead for what are expected to be several weeks of observations, sample-drilling and on-board laboratory analysis of the area's rocks.

With arrival at this location, Curiosity has driven at total of 6.1 kilometres since landing inside Gale Crater on Mars in August 2012.

The mission's investigations at the Kimberley are planned as the most extensive since Curiosity spent the first half of 2013 in an area called Yellowknife Bay.

At Yellowknife Bay, the one-tonne rover examined the first samples ever drilled from rocks on Mars and found the signature of an ancient lake-bed environment providing chemical ingredients and energy necessary for life.

At the Kimberley and, later, at outcrops on the slope of Mount Sharp inside Gale Crater, researchers plan to use Curiosity's science instruments to learn more about habitable past conditions and environmental changes.

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